Eject > Internet Crimes > 57 States Affected by Internet Crimes – Statistics and Analysis (Including U.S. Territories)

57 States Affected by Internet Crimes – Statistics and Analysis (Including U.S. Territories)

Internet Crimes

Cyber Crime is a broad term that represents a host of criminal activities done through a computer or a similar system. It involves gaining illegal access to a computer and using it to manipulate and transmit data. The activity could be theft, fraud, or distributing child pornography.

The sad bit is that as technology increases, the instances of cybercrime increase as well. And though measures and laws are set up to protect netizens from such heinous acts, criminals are getting more creative in their ways. To give you an idea of the real situation in the U.S., below are cybercrime statistics in the different states:

1. California

It is only right that California tops this list. It is the tech capital of the world. The Silicon Valley in Northern California is home to the tech giants, including Facebook, Apple, and Google. Because of this, tech moves at a faster rate. But with improved technology, instances of cybercrime are also through the roof as shown below:

  • Count by Victim – 50,132
  • Total Losses by Victim – $573,624,151
  • Count by Subject– 17,517
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – 183,168,069

2. Florida

In 2019, four cities in Florida were hit by network security breaches. Following the breaches, the hit companies, including Lake City and Riviera Beach paid handsomely to the con artists to recover their systems. The two companies paid cash to the tune of $460,000 and $600,000, respectively.

Even worse, Naples paid $700,000 to recover its systems. But these are just the tip of the iceberg. Statistics reveal the following numbers:

  • Count by Victim – 27,178
  • Total Losses by Victim – $293,445,963
  • Count by Subject– 11,047
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $95,910,080

3. Indiana

Cybercrime in Indiana is taken seriously by the state government. This is clear from the systems, including a hotline created for reporting cybercrime instances. And though they are tough on cybercrime artists, their laws require the act to be intentional before prosecution. With that said, below is how much the state is affected by cybercrime.

  • Count by Victim – 9,746
  • Total Losses by Victim – $24,030,998
  • Count by Subject– 1,933
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $231,002,496

4. Texas

In 2017, lawmakers in the state set up laws to crack down on cybercrime. The Texas Cybercrime Act passed unanimously. The law made cybercrime a third-degree felony.

This move was necessitated by the increased instances of hacking, theft, and fraud. Also, their increased complexity and sophistication played a part in this. Were it not for the loss sustained; the crimes are almost impressive.

Below are the statistics of cybercrime in Texas.

  • Count by Victim – 27,178
  • Total Losses by Victim – $221,535,479
  • Count by Subject– 10,093
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $126,282,907

5. New York

2018 was a successful year for cybercrime professionals in the Big Apple. In a little over a month, cybercriminals managed to bring down computer systems in Atlanta, disrupt the 911 emergency system in Baltimore, and take the transportation system in Colorado offline.

These isolated attacks in Atlanta cost taxpayers a whopping $17 million. And shockingly, they were a few of the many that were held against public institutions, including government offices, hospitals, and banks.

Below are statistics of how things went down in 2019.

  • Count by Victim – 13,095
  • Total Losses by Victim – $198,765,769
  • Count by Subject– 8,345
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $95,996,214

6. Washington

Though Washington State set strict rules on cybercrime in 2016, things are not exactly roses and rainbows.

Washington features in the top 10 on states worst hit by cybercrime with males ranking 6th as the most victimized in the U.S. and females ranking the 4th worst.

Here are added stats in 2019.

  • Count by Victim – 31,095
  • Total Losses by Victim – $71,286,037
  • Count by Subject– 3,317
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $31,928,985

7. Maryland

Though many underhand activities constitute cybercrime in Maryland, in the past two years, there has been an increase in the number of business email compromises.

Cybercriminals gain access to company systems through emails. They usually use the persona of a trusted or high ranking official in the company. According to an FBI report, below are the cybersecurity stats for 2019 in Maryland.

  • Count by Victim – 11,709
  • Total Losses by Victim – $52,830,779
  • Count by Subject– 7,228
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $26,977,444

8. Virginia

Virginia holds talks and workshops to train business owners in the education and technology sectors on how they can safeguard themselves from these crimes. Though the state took steps and made a variety of cyber activities illegal with harsh convictions, cyber theft/fraud cases continue to rise.

Most cyber threats include ransomware, malware, and phishing. Below are other stats to show the extent of the security issue here.

  • Count by Victim – 11,674
  • Total Losses by Victim – $92,467,791
  • Count by Subject– 4,829
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $24,879,452

9. Pennsylvania

Believe it or not, Pennsylvanians fear to be cybercrime victims than they are of personal and property crimes. And their concerns are legitimized by the stats below.

According to the FBI statistics and analysis, Pennsylvania ranks in the top 10 for cybercrime. More than 10,000 people fell victim to some form of cybercrime.

Here are more details on the situation:

  • Count by Victim – 10,914
  • Total Losses by Victim – $94,281,611
  • Count by Subject– 2,793
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $ 29,787,276

10. Illinois

Depending on the crime, cybercriminals stand to face both federal and state charges. This is because most crimes cross the state lines, and the computer crime law passed allows for it as a way of discouraging it. But even then, Illinois has a long way to go in curbing cybercrime, especially since it’s among the worst-hit states.

Below are some stats according to the FBI in 2019:

  • Count by Victim – 10,337
  • Total Losses by Victim – $107,152,415
  • Count by Subject– 3,465
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $48,100,395

11. Colorado

Colorado’s cybercrime laws are a couple of decades old. And though the federal government tries most of these crimes, the computer crime laws in Colorado reach further than federal statutes and laws set up in other states.

Like other states, computer crime law covers unauthorized access. But more to this, it also covers authorized access that surpasses authorized use.

According to the FBI, these are the stats on Cybercrime in Colorado:

  • Count by Victim – 9,689
  • Total Losses by Victim – $65,118,524
  • Count by Subject– 1,848
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $16,678,494

12. Ohio

Since the shooting in Parkland, Florida, special agents working with the Ohio AG’s Bureau of Criminal Investigation Cyber Crimes unit admit that threats on social media in Ohio have increased. But even with this increase, they are confident in their hi-tech methods to help police in capturing people behind these threats and who commit other cybercrimes. According to an FBI report in 2019, Ohio State has the below cybercrime statistics:

  • Count by Victim – 9,321
  • Total Losses by Victim – $264,663,456
  • Count by Subject– 2,506
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $14,569,674

13. Georgia

In 2019, the state of Georgia helped to stop an organized cybercrime network with reach in the U.S. and the world. The network used GozNym (a malware) to infect computers and in the process made away with $100 million from over 41,000 institutions.

The malware used included inaccessible domains, encrypted malicious programs, technical support, and spammers. Ten members of the group are charged in Pittsburgh while the gang leader and the assistant are charged in Georgia. Though this was a major win, it doesn’t hide the numbers that had been piling up in the year. Below is what the FBI has on cybercrime in Georgia:

  • Count by Victim – 9,074
  • Total Losses by Victim – $79,732,460
  • Count by Subject– 3,325
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $55,338,192

https://agenda.ge/en/news/2019/1299

14. New Jersey

A serious fight against cybercrime in New Jersey started in 2010. The mission at the time was to protect businesses from computer crime. Currently, as the cybercriminals become more creative and cause huge losses to the state, over $1.4 billion in losses to businesses and individuals, New Jersey tightened the noose on every cybercrime case. But there is still a lot to be done. According to a report by the FBI in 2019, below is where New Jersey stands:

  • Count by Victim – 9,067
  • Total Losses by Victim – $106,474,464
  • Count by Subject– 3,312
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $32,048,215

https://techwerxe.com/cyber-assessments-essex-county-nj/

15. Michigan

According to the FBI, cybercrime has affected a lot of people in Michigan and caused huge losses and pain. The stats are as follows.

  • Count by Victim – 8,249
  • Total Losses by Victim – $47,122,182
  • Count by Subject– 2,029
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $13,466,196

Owing to the increased number of victims, Michigan decided to open cybercrime support as well as a recovery hotline. Those living in Kent County can call 2-1-1 and receive the help they need. The state plans to expand the program in time.

https://www.interlochenpublicradio.org/post/michigan-starts-its-first-cybercrime-hotline-grand-rapids

16. North Carolina

On March 2020, North Carolina was hit by Russian ransomware – the same guys believed to be behind the state of emergency in New Orleans in 2019. The Russian hit Durham County and Durham City. This attack adds to the statistics and verifies the report by the FBI on state cybercrime in the U.S. Below are some statistics for North Carolina.

  • Count by Victim – 8,223
  • Total Losses by Victim – $48,425,764
  • Count by Subject– 2,259
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $13,983,462

https://www.forbes.com/sites/daveywinder/2020/03/10/two-russian-ransomware-attacks-take-down-north-carolina-city-and-county-government-systems/#dc76d6b588fa

17. Arizona

In 2015, Arizona ranked 7th as the worst-hit state by cybercrime. At the time, more than 60,500 people had fallen victim to some form of cybercrime, and millions of dollars had been lost. Over the years, the situation got worse before it started getting better. According to an FBI cybercrime report in 2019, Arizona ranks 17. Below are its numbers at that position.

  • Count by Victim – 7,795
  • Total Losses by Victim – $47,058,842
  • Count by Subject– 2,119
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $25,960,706

18. Massachusetts

Two Mass men were arrested in 2019 and charged in a Boston court for running a scheme on social media where they took over social media accounts of unsuspecting citizens and used them to steal cryptocurrency through hacking and SIM swapping. These men add to the statistics as reported by the FBI. Here is a full picture of how things were in 2019.

  • Count by Victim – 6,492
  • Total Losses by Victim – $84,173,754
  • Count by Subject– 1,480
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $20,192,012

19. Nevada

It’s not the absence of strict computer crime laws that led to Nevada having over 6,000 cybercrime victims in 2018. On the contrary, if you are found guilty of cybercrime in Nevada for the first time, you are charged with not more than a year in prison or less than $100,000 in fines ($200,000) for companies.

However, if it’s a subsequent conviction, felons face imprisonment of not more than ten years and a fine not exceeding $250,000 for individuals and $500,000 for corporations. Despite these laws, a 2019 FBI report disclosed the following cybercrime stats in Nevada:

  • Count by Victim – 6,381
  • Total Losses by Victim – $35,720,611
  • Count by Subject– 2,481
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $13,497,823

20. Wisconsin

Wisconsin comes in 20th ranking by the number of cyber victims in 2019. According to the FBI report, the victims were more than 6000. And according to computer crime lawyers, cyber crime has been on the rise over the years. But on the flip side, computer crime laws have been on the rise as well. Below is a full picture of what cybercrime in Wisconsin looked like in 2019:

  • Count by Victim – 6,378
  • Total Losses by Victim – $21,576,109
  • Count by Subject– 933
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $10,722,858

21. Tennessee

In Tennessee, denial of service constitutes as cybercrime. This is shocking and, to an extent, scary for business owners. However, very few are charged with this crime. Many who contribute to the below cybercrime statistics in Tennessee perform hacking, install malware, fraud, identity theft, phishing, and more.

  • Count by Victim – 5,586
  • Total Losses by Victim – $33,052,233
  • Count by Subject– 2,186
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $15,532,247

22. Iowa

According to an FBI cybercrime study in Iowa in 2016, the state lost about $5 million to cybercrime. Over the years, even with stricter laws, this figure has increased tremendously.

According to the 2019 FBI cybercrime report, below are the recent statistics.

  • Count by Victim – 5,094
  • Total Losses by Victim – $27,919,567
  • Count by Subject– 612
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $5,763,972

23. Missouri

About half a decade ago, Missouri citizens lost about $7.1 million in cybercrime. This number has since quadrupled with citizens of all walks of life and ages falling victim to these activities. To remain safe, you are advised to use strong passwords for your online accounts and not to use one for all. You should also be on the lookout for suspicious activities to ensure you are not part of the statistics.

  • Count by Victim – 5,083
  • Total Losses by Victim – $27,290,803
  • Count by Subject– 1,376
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $6,432,347

24. Oregon

Even with cases of cybercrime being rampant in the state, a quick audit reveals that businesses still don’t have basic controls to protect their systems and information from attacks. Because of this, Oregon citizens have lost quite a lot of money over the years. Below is a quick overview.

  • Count by Victim – 4,813
  • Total Losses by Victim – $37,088,022
  • Count by Subject– 1,240
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $9,325,763

25. South Carolina

The FBI recorded a $20+ million loss by South Carolina citizens. And with such a huge amount of money lost, only a few people felt the pinch. Here is a breakdown of the FBI cybersecurity statistics in the state:

  • Count by Victim – 4,541
  • Total Losses by Victim – $20,186,041
  • Count by Subject– 1,137
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $8,454,695

26. Connecticut

Though it is not one of the worst-hit states, officials in Connecticut state that the effects of cybercrime are felt every day. ‘Bad actors’ are on the prowl to disrupt normal peaceful lives.

In 2018, the impact was insane. Below are the stats to back the claims:

  • Count by Victim – 4,412
  • Total Losses by Victim – $33,789,138
  • Count by Subject– 846
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $17,845,526

27. Minnesota

For many who were before the new millennium, the internet feels like it was made recently. But it has evolved so much, and its effects can be felt in all industries. However, the same tool has been used to rob Americans billions of dollars every year. In 2017, identity theft contributed to a $905 million loss. In 2018 the stats were worse in Minnesota. They are as follows:

  • Count by Victim – 4,388
  • Total Losses by Victim – $39,421,520
  • Count by Subject– 1,276
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $11,518,980

28. Alabama

Some students at the University of Alabama are okay with being baits so that they can learn the ways of the unscrupulous thieves behind the screens and pay them back. Though it seems risky, with so many victims, some citizens in Alabama feel like treating fire with fire is the way to go. The statistics below back their actions:

  • Count by Victim – 4,108
  • Total Losses by Victim – $20,586,392
  • Count by Subject– 1,049
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $7,988,933

29. Louisiana

In 2019, Tangipahoa Parish was one of the cybercrime victims. The attack was part of an ongoing streak of attacks on Louisiana schools. After this, Louisiana businesses and citizens were on high alert. This instance shows how much more security institutions require. Do not be part of these statistics:

  • Count by Victim – 3,084
  • Total Losses by Victim – $24,214,439
  • Count by Subject– 1,103
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $4,958,777

30. Utah

According to the Utah police, in 2009, cybercriminals managed to impersonate a public university network and divert $2.5 million from the state’s account to private accounts in Texas. Though the police froze the accounts and reduced the losses, the criminals made away with $300,000. This happened a decade ago, and things have since gotten worse as seen below:

  • Count by Victim – 3,304
  • Total Losses by Victim – $46,458,273
  • Count by Subject– 934
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $7,912,016

31. Kentucky

According to the FBI Internet Crime Complaint Center, those living in Kentucky lost more than $9.3 million through cybercrime in 2018. Louisville’s Park Duvalle community Center paid close to $70,000 in bitcoin ransom as a result of ransomware. The full FBI report for 2018 is as follows:

  • Count by Victim – 3,063
  • Total Losses by Victim – $17,014,895
  • Count by Subject– 789
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $4,704,251

32. Oklahoma

No one is safe from cybercrime – not even the police in Oklahoma. In 2019, hackers made away with a whopping $4.2 million from the police retirement scheme, which had about $1 billion. And though the money was stolen, the management insisted that the beneficiaries and members would be protected from the risk.

Aside from this, thousands of individuals fell victim to cybercrime as below:

  • Count by Victim – 2,867
  • Total Losses by Victim – $28,556,326
  • Count by Subject– 940
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $12,082,341

33. New Mexico

If you are passionate about making a change in New Mexico, how about you enroll in a cybersecurity course and use the information to protect yourself and more than 2000 other victims. Since 2014, New Mexico institutions have set aside money to facilitate the learning of this course. Online courses are also available. If you don’t have a push to do it, how about this:

  • Count by Victim – 2,037
  • Total Losses by Victim – $17,983,833
  • Count by Subject– 943
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $1,889,690

34. Arkansas

In the last one and a half years, Arkansas cities have been experiencing a wave of cybercrime and forgery. Mayors and city officials have been on edge for fear of state money being robbed on their watch. In 2018, more than $22,000,000 was lost through cybercrime. Because of this, they have embarked on new methods to fight cybercrime, including using Bitcoin. A drastic move? Not quite. Here are what the state dealt with in 2018:

  • Count by Victim – 1,991
  • Total Losses by Victim – $22,681,002
  • Count by Subject– 532
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $3,206,417

35. Kansas

In 2015, Kansas was a hotbed for cybercrime. It was among the worst hit. And though it has improved in the ranking, the losses and people affected have increased as well (which is not good news). In 2015, the cybercrime victims lost $3.9 million, and in 2018, they lost more than $16 million. Here is a clear picture of the losses and victims:

  • Count by Victim – 1,970
  • Total Losses by Victim – $16,107,619
  • Count by Subject– 976
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $8,954,238

https://www.kwch.com/content/news/New-law-enforcement-unit-to-crack-down-on-cybercrime-510271281.html

36. Mississippi

Owing to the increased risk of cybercrime, its victims, and money lost, the state of Mississippi has decided to take matters into its own hands by setting up a Cyber Crime Fusion Center that will help the entire country, not just Mississippians. The effect of cyber insecurity is as follows:

  • Count by Victim – 1,654
  • Total Losses by Victim – $10,129,650
  • Count by Subject– 748
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $2,518,412

37. Idaho

According to the National Cyber Security Alliance, 50% of small businesses are at the risk of cyberattacks. More than 70% of cybercriminals attack startups. Therefore, 60% of these businesses are hacked and go under in less than six months. Aside from this, the FBI documents a lot of money has been lost as listed below:

  • Count by Victim – 1,485
  • Total Losses by Victim – $12,627,102
  • Count by Subject– 432
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $5,892,792

38. Alaska

A community in Alaska was the victim of a malware attack which even forced the state to go offline. It is then that they realized their heavy dependence on computers. Though it wasn’t discovered where it came from, the malware spread in a matter of hours and took down systems, including booking systems. Loads of money were lost. That year, millions of money was lost as below;

  • Count by Victim – 1,451
  • Total Losses by Victim – $9,654,238
  • Count by Subject– 222
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $1,431,485

39. District of Columbia

The FBI 2019 report shows that over 1400 state citizens fell victim to cybercrimes. Also, a lot of money was lost in the process. You can keep yourself safe by keeping up-to-date internet security software and enabling real-time protection against malware and other viruses. You should also use strong passwords to avoid part of the following statistics:

  • Count by Victim – 1,407
  • Total Losses by Victim – $12,175,460
  • Count by Subject– 779
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $8,280,731

40. Hawaii

Hawaii is a leading tourist destination. But while you are here, you should not let your guard down when you are online. Though things aren’t as bad as in other states, they aren’t the best either. The FBI disclosed the amounts of money lost to cybercrime, and it is insane.

  • Count by Victim – 1,396
  • Total Losses by Victim – $10,005,566
  • Count by Subject– 547
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $4,761,209

41. Nebraska

Victims of cybercrime are a little over 1000. But this doesn’t mean that all is sunshine and rainbows. From these few victims, millions of money was lost. In 2019, as the two serial cybercriminals from Russia were apprehended, charges were also filed in Nebraska against a John Doe. The charges were Zeus- related. The figures provided by the FBI concerning cybercrime in Nebraska are as follows:

  • Count by Victim – 1,350
  • Total Losses by Victim – $14,596,769
  • Count by Subject– 1201
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $2,614,627

42. West Virginia

The number of cybercrime victims in West Virginia is in the thousands. But then, according to research, West Virginia victims are the least likely to come forward when robbed in comparison to those in other states. With that said, the FBI report shows the following:

  • Count by Victim – 1,227
  • Total Losses by Victim – $5,442,899
  • Count by Subject– 262
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $2,754,324

43. New Hampshire

The financial impact of cyberattacks in New Hampshire, like in other states, continues to grow tremendously. In 2016, the FBI reported a $3.1 million loss and a $3.7 million loss in 2017 due to cybercrime. In 2018, the statistics were as below:

  • Count by Victim – 1,155
  • Total Losses by Victim – $7,284,552
  • Count by Subject– 264
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $3,520,598

44. Delaware

Like many U.S. states, Delaware’s economy thrives on technology and innovation. Being prepared for future growth and expansion means the state has to grow an army of cyber professionals to protect them from cyber criminals before things get even worse. As it is, the state has lost a lot through cybercrime, including:

  • Count by Victim – 1,062
  • Total Losses by Victim – $6,105,401
  • Count by Subject– 948
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $2,548,620

https://www.delawareonline.com/story/opinion/contributors/2017/12/19/delaware-getting-ready-future-cybersecurity-delaware-voice/964801001/

45. Rhode Island

Rhode Island launched a cybercrime support team and a recovery hotline in May 2019. Rhode Islanders can dial 2-1-1 to report and get access to resources that will help them recover from identity theft. This move came after the state realized an increased threat from cybercriminals. It is not the worst-hit state, but still, the numbers are high enough to warrant your attention.

  • Count by Victim – 1,011
  • Total Losses by Victim – $10,182,363
  • Count by Subject– 241
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $2,105,153

46. Montana

With the below cybercrime stats,

  • Count by Victim – 967
  • Total Losses by Victim – $8,295,010
  • Count by Subject– 832
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $3,235,197,

Montana decided to hire a new cybercrime agent to help with the fight. The Department of Criminal Investigations Computer and Internet Crime Unit saw this as the right move after receiving 3500 complaints of cybercrimes. A new agent will potentially save the state millions of dollars.

47. Maine

In 2019, Maine’s capital was targeted by a malware attack. The attack froze a huge chunk of its network. It was found in 12 city computers and a couple of other devices, including ten servers. Though the city servers were not damaged, it was a huge scare.

According to the FBI, cybercrime in Maine had the following figures in 2018:

  • Count by Victim – 880
  • Total Losses by Victim – $3,267,370
  • Count by Subject– 312
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $1,656,784

48. Puerto Rico

The 2019 FBI report shows that Puerto Rico lost about $7 million. Recently (in 2020), one of their government agencies wired $2.6 million to scammers after being duped through email phishing. The money had been transferred by an unsuspecting employee in a Development Company. The stats in 2019 looks as follows:

  • Count by Victim – 839
  • Total Losses by Victim – $7,668,517
  • Count by Subject– 476
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $852,121

49. Wyoming

The FBI has been vigorous in its fight against cybercrime in Wyoming. But it hasn’t brought them to a halt. In 2019, many services came to a standstill in Campbell County Memorial hospital after a hacker disabled its computer systems. It took 18 days to get back online and streamline the services. A lot of revenue was lost in the process, which contributed to the following statistics:

  • Count by Victim – 550
  • Total Losses by Victim – $8,138,463
  • Count by Subject– 175
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $1,547,198

50. Vermont

In 2018, a cybercriminal hacked a school’s network and attempted to steal $50,000 through bank transfer. However, the staff members were alerted, thanks to the cybersecurity measures that were in place. But not every similar scenario ends with a happy ending. As such, more than $2 million have been lost over time. Other cybercrime stats include:

  • Count by Victim – 500
  • Total Losses by Victim – $2,329,973
  • Count by Subject– 131
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $686,424

51. North Dakota

Cyberattacks in North Dakota are on the rise, and they aren’t just on the state. The criminals are targeting small businesses as well. The state believes that to reduce the figures on these statistics, they need to start with employee education and the basics on cybersecurity and staying safe online.

  • Count by Victim – 489
  • Total Losses by Victim – $4,527,733
  • Count by Subject– 377
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $1,452,038

52. South Dakota

According to the former director of global intelligence for FireEye Laura Galante, calculating the cost of cybercrime in the future is difficult given the ever-changing descriptions. But before we peep into the future, let’s look back at the effects cybercrime had in South Dakota in 2019. The statistics are as follows:

  • Count by Victim – 473
  • Total Losses by Victim – $3,086,846
  • Count by Subject– 133
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $975,629

53. U.S. Virgin Islands

A lot of money exchanges hands in this area. And were it not for the widespread cybercrime in the U.S., a recent police cyberattack would have been mortifying news.

According to the FBI, the U.S. Virgin Islands lost over $2 million to cybercrime. In addition to this, the report had this:

  • Count by Victim – 75
  • Total Losses by Victim – $2,113,723
  • Count by Subject– 12
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $27,748

54. Guam

Guam is often seen as a speck of Island on the map. However, the FBI tells people living on the Island to be wary of cyberattacks. In the past, the bad actors have managed to get away with a couple of hundreds of thousands. Though it may not be much, it is still money that people worked hard for. A complete statistic on the Island includes:

  • Count by Victim – 71
  • Total Losses by Victim – $898,265
  • Count by Subject– 11
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $15,041

55. U.S Minor Outlying Islands

This is one of the few promising islands in the U.S. Here, cybercrime is low, as shown in the FBI report. Only about $143, 012, was lost in 2019 through cybercrime. Though it’s not zero, it’s better than millions. The report also stated:

  • Count by Victim – 46
  • Count by Subject– 19
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $77,491

56. American Samoa

American Samoa is generally safe in the actual and internet streets. According to the FBI:

  • Count by Victim – 23
  • Total Losses by Victim – $16,359
  • Count by Subject– 7
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $12,100

57. Northern Marina Islands

Like Northern Samoa, Norther Marina Islands are safe. Only a meager $2,300 was lost through cybercrime in 2019. This is quite impressive. Other statistics are:

  • Count by Victim – 11
  • Count by Subject– 1
  • Subject Earnings as a Destination State – $0

Crime Type Definitions

  • Overpayment – here, someone is sent some payment and instructed to retain a certain percentage. Then they are asked to send back the remaining.
  • Advanced fee – in these situations, victims are led to believe they have won a large reward or qualify for a loan, but they need to pay fees or taxes to access the money. After payment, the reward or loan is never received as promised.
  • Email account compromise/ business email compromise – this scheme targets individuals or businesses who regularly wire money for payments. Fraudsters compromise email accounts through intrusion techniques or social engineering.
  • Charity – cybercriminals create false charities around natural disasters and solicit for funds only to benefit through the donations made by unsuspecting victims.
  • Civil matter – these are disputes submitted to the court, but aren’t criminal
  • Romance/confidence fraud – the perpetrator deceives the victim that they have a relationship with based on trust. It could be a romantic, friendly, or family relationship. Based on the trust, the perpetrator persuades the victim to send money.
  • Corporate data breach – this is the release of data from a secure location to an untrusted environment.
  • Crimes against children – these are any crimes related to exploiting children sexually or physically.
  • Denial of service –this type of crime floods a system with requests and causes it to slow down or shut down.
  • Employment – individuals are made to believe they are employed legitimately only for them to lose money.
  • Extortion – extracting money from an individual by intimidating them. It may include threatening, physical harm or public exposure.
  • Gambling – also known as iGambling. It involves placing bets online on sports or virtual casino games.
  • Government impersonation – impersonating a government official to get money from an individual or company.
  • Hacktivist – hacking networks with the sole purpose of promoting political or social agendas.
  • Harassment – This is when the perpetrator results in false accusations to intimidate victims.
  • Healthcare-related – this involves defrauding public or private health care institutions. It involves issuing fake health insurance, insurance cards or selling health information.
  • Copyright and counterfeit – the illegal use of another person’s idea, creative expressions or inventions.
  • Identity theft – involves stealing someone’s identity by using their identification documents, including their social security number and name to commit a crime or empty their accounts.
  • Investment – lying to individuals to make an investment based on false information. The offers usually have low risks, but very high returns.
  • Lottery/inheritance – this is where individuals receive calls regarding winning the lottery while they never even played. They may also be called to collect their inheritance to someone who they don’t even know.
  • Malware – a piece of software or even a line of code designed to disable, damage or disrupt computer systems.
  • Misrepresentation –selling goods under the guise of being high quality only for the buyer to receive low-quality products than what they paid for.
  • Non-delivery/non-payment – in non-payment, goods are delivered, but the purchaser doesn’t pay for them. With non-delivery, the payment is sent, but the service or the goods are not delivered.
  • Personal data breach – this is leaking personal data into an environment that is not secure or trusted.
  • Phishing – unsolicited emails, telephone calls or text messages requesting your login details.
  • Ransomware – malicious software intended to block users from using a system until the perpetrator is paid.
  • Rental/ real estate – fraud involving real estate or rental property.
  • Spoofing – contact information is altered to look like it’s from a trusted source.
  • Social media – a complaint detailing the use of social media as a method of committing fraud.
  • Tech support – trying to gain access to a victim’s account or electronic device by claiming to be the official tech support team of a popular company.
  • Terrorism – violent activities to instill fear for political, ideological or religious purposes.
  • Virtual currency – a complaint that mentions cryptocurrency in the exchange.

Common Questions

1. What is considered an internet crime?

This is any illegal activity committed through the internet, or on the internet.

2. What are the top 5 cybercrimes?

The top 5 cybercrimes include phishing scams, identity theft, online harassment, ransomware, and malware.

3. What are the four major categories of computer crimes?

Different people list different computer crimes, but below are the main categories:

  • Telecommunications crimes
  • Computer manipulation crimes
  • Internal computer crimes
  • Theft of computer software and hardware

4. When was cybercrime started?

Cybercrime heavily depends on the internet. As such, it did not take off until the start of the 21st century. The increase in the number of people putting their information online in a database facilitated this.

5. What is the punishment for cybercrime?

The punishment for when you are found guilty depends on the state, the extent of the crime, and whether it is your first or subsequent time. But generally, cybercriminals are punished by imprisonment or a fine.

6. Why is cybercrime increasing?

It is quite simple; because our lives depend and revolve around technology. Though technology and the internet have brought positive changes, they can be manipulated to have the opposite effect.

7. What is cyber theft?

This is the process of leveraging the internet to steal property or interfere with them using it for the sole purpose of personal gain.

8. Who commits cybercrime?

Small groups or dedicated individuals commit most of the cybercrimes. However, some large groups have taken advantage of the internet and committed large scale fraud. These individuals simply treat cybercrime as a job.

9. What are the dangers of cybercrime?

Some of the dangers include denial of service, cyber bullying, phishing, computer viruses, email cracking and spying, child pornography, software privacy, and card fraud.

10. How big is cybercrime?

It is one of the greatest threats to companies and small businesses around the world. The impact they have is seen in the numbers shown above. In a year, it can cost the U.S. trillions in lost revenue and stolen money.

11. What is internet crime, and what are the three types of internet crime?

It is an illegal activity conducted via the internet. The top three types include stalking, identity theft, and slander.

12. What is the most common type of cybercrime?

A lot of crimes happen online every day. However, the most prevalent is identity theft.

13. What are the effects of cybercrime in organizations?

The impact of cybercrime includes:

  • Opportunity costs, including employment and service disruptions
  • Loss of intellectual property as well as sensitive data
  • Damaging the company reputation and brand
  • Cost of insurance and countermeasures
  • Loss of competitiveness and trade
  • Loss of jobs
  • Penalties and compensation to clients and customers

Conclusion

Technology is with us and it’s here to stay. And though it comes bearing gifts, it can be used to destroy the progress made. The best weapon to use against such crimes is technology. Yes, states should invest in cybersecurity courses and sensitizing business owners and employees on how to be safe online. Also, since the criminals get crafty, once caught, they should serve harsh penalties to discourage others in the same line of business.